Author Topic: An old Essex term that should be in common use.  (Read 84 times)

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Offline K@

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An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« on: April 02, 2019, 11:47:19 AM »
"Toot", which is pronounced like we pronounce "Foot".

Not "Tat", which is just cheap rubbish. Toot is cheap stuff, which looks good and might well be very useful, but you know it'll fall apart, in minutes, once you get it home.

Like some of the stuff they sell in B&M.
The trouble with cats is that they've got no tact. - P. G. Wodehouse

Offline Lisa

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2019, 16:14:07 PM »
We say foot to rhyme with put.
where are toot sounds like boot

We do use the word tat though
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Offline K@

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2019, 10:10:15 AM »
Yeah, we rhyme "Foot" with "Put". Up here, though, "Duck" rhymes with "book". In some places, "Book" sounds like we'd say "Boot". They don't have the hard "U" sound, at all, here.

All rather odd, these northerners. ;)
The trouble with cats is that they've got no tact. - P. G. Wodehouse

Offline El

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2019, 13:07:26 PM »
It's booooook but some incomers say buck.
Tat is useless stuff like plastic beads or a fake object that doesn't do what it should?
Mard is used often for someone who might not want to do something because it's cold, it's hot, they're ill or any excuse. They  just won't face up to something.  Or if you fall as a child and sit there whining.  You would say "Get up ! don't be so bloody mard".  Although I think that saying is very local.

Offline K@

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2019, 19:48:29 PM »
Mard's a good one. I've heard "Mard-arse", quite a bit. I quite like "Mithered", too.
The trouble with cats is that they've got no tact. - P. G. Wodehouse

Offline El

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2019, 09:11:23 AM »
Oh yes. I use that a lot.   It's used here when someone or thing is constantly asking for something or wanting something. Or in the dogs case, needing to go out or her bowl needs filling or mithering me to stroke her. Or you can be feeling mithered when there are lots of things to do and can't get nothing done. That when your brain mithers you and won't shut up.

My gran would say that someone looked "starved" in winter when they were cold.
My dad would say "nesh" instead of mard.

Offline K@

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2019, 15:51:54 PM »
Jane says "Nesh" means cold, but someone who's being a bit wet, too. "Mithered" is quite useful, as it means "Bothered", in a way, but it's not quite the same. Are you fairly near Manchester, then?

What is it, about calling rolls cakes, here? A bread roll's called a barm cake and nobody seems to know why.

Who's Piffy, too? Why's he on a rock bun? ;)
« Last Edit: April 05, 2019, 15:53:35 PM by K@ »
The trouble with cats is that they've got no tact. - P. G. Wodehouse

Offline El

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2019, 16:53:06 PM »
8 miles from Manchester. Have quite a few relatives in Eccles.
Bothered for mithered is spot on 😉 and it's a Barm cake. Some times, we have butties, sometimes Sarnies,  we eat tater hash and ....my gran had a saying if you said " I thought such and such" she would reply "well you know what though did! Climbed on a muck cart and thought it was a wedding"  Sheeeesh.
I don't know who Piffy is 😎

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Re: An old Essex term that should be in common use.
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2019, 13:31:45 PM »
Yeah, that's the one. The southern equivalent's standing around, like a tit in a trance. We're twenty minutes, or so, from Piccadilly, along the line to Chester. A bit out in the sticks, near Dunham Massey.

A lot of those sayings are quite universal, like putting the wood in the 'ole and Use yer loaf. Manchester caviar's funny. :) Brassic started in the East End, as rhyming slang "Brassic lint" -> "Skint". "Up the wooden hill" was part of a rhyme. Up wooden hill, down sheet lane and off to the land of nod.

I remember falling foul of weird sayings. Jane and I were going somewhere and I was messing about on the computer, whilst I waited for her to get ready. After a while, she stuck her head around the door and asked "Are you right?". I said, "Yeah, I'm fine", thinking "Eh?" and carried on. A few minutes later, this was repeated. The next time, she asked if I was right and I thought "There's something I'm missing". So, I said "Yeah, I'm fine. Are you ready, yet?". "I'm waiting for you!". Eh? "I asked if you were right!". "Eh?"

We don't have "Are you right?" dahn sahf, meaning "Are you ready?"
The trouble with cats is that they've got no tact. - P. G. Wodehouse